HEARD  DIED FOUR YEARS AGO

HEARD DIED FOUR YEARS AGO

John Heard Jr., John Boy, was insubordinate, was lyrical, was ridiculously unselfish, and he was charismatic as hell. He was so authentic, so straightforward, so odd, so sensual, and so bold.

He died 4 years ago.

“I used to be a good actor. When I was younger, I was going to be a big star.” – John Heard.

But nothing was more potent than Heard’s review in life. He breathed in hard, electric, and fearlessly. He was wild and passionate. He was as faithful, loyal, honest, dedicated, loyal, genuine, dependable, trustworthy, and generous as they come. He was a friend and a dear neighbor and a legend in his time.

In 2008, he said: “I think I had my time. I dropped the ball, as my father would say. I could have done more with my career than I did, and I got sidetracked. But that’s OK, that’s alright, that’s the way it is—no sour grapes. I mean, I don’t have any regrets except that I could have played some more significant parts. I could have played Hamlet, I could have played Iago in Othello, I could have played A Long Day’s Journey, and I had some problems, and it didn’t work. And those … I regret. I regret not having those heavyweight parts under my belt.”

His favorites jobs: Cutter’s Way, Mindwalk and C.H.U.D

My favorite Heard’s movies: Mindwalk ( 1990) and Steel City (2006)

Let’s play soccer

Let’s play soccer

Soccer has the dangerous function of diverting society from its priority problems, such as unemployment, poor income distribution, social injustice, and the precarious living conditions of specific segments of our community.

Let's play soccer

Soccer is the “opium of people.” It serves as an instrument of the ruling class to manipulate the masses to sublimate the misery and misadventures of poverty through the meteoric success of winning a domestic championship or international. The primary meaning of soccer has been its use by the elite to support the official ideology and direct social energy in ways compatible with prevailing social values.

Israel Becomes the First Country Ever to Ban Fur

Israel Becomes the First Country Ever to Ban Fur

More proof that PETA could bring about the end of the fur industry: After years of persistent campaigning by the organization and local activists, Israel has banned the sale of fur, making it the first country in the world to do so.

The historic ban represents a victory for so many. PETA Senior Vice President of Campaigns Dan Mathews and PETA Honorary Director Pamela Anderson personally lobbied government officials in Tel Aviv and appealed to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to support a ban on fur. Local activists have campaigned for years to achieve such a ban. Israel Minister of Environmental Protection Gila Gamliel signed the bill into law today after an overwhelming 86% of Israelis showed support for the proposal. Most importantly, this victory belongs to animals—the rabbits, minks, foxes, and other vulnerable species who suffer and are killed for human vanity.

Pamela Anderson has been speaking out against the fur industry for years—the PETA honorary director was among the first to bare all for PETA’s “I’d Rather Go Naked Than Wear Fur” campaign.

I'd Rather Go Naked Than Wear Fur

For decades, PETA and our international affiliates have exposed horrific cruelty on fur farms, demonstrating that animals spend their entire lives confined to cramped, filthy wire cages. Fur farmers use the cheapest killing methods available, including neck-breaking, suffocation, poisoning, and genital electrocution. Numerous video investigations have revealed minks being gassed en masse, foxes being electrocuted, rabbits screaming in pain as they’re shocked with electrical devices, and numerous animals being skinned alive.

There’s another reason every country should follow in Israel’s footsteps: Cramming sick and stressed animals together in unsanitary conditions on fur farms creates the perfect breeding ground for deadly diseases. The novel coronavirus has been found on mink fur farms in a dozen countries—Canada, Denmark (where a variant of the disease in minks infected humans), France, Greece, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the U.S.—resulting in the emergency mass slaughter of tens of millions of animals.

The momentum against fur continues to grow around the world.

Israel is in good company: California banned the sale of new fur statewide in 2019, and numerous top designers and retailers—including Macy’sNordstrom, Burberry, GucciVersaceMichael Kors, Jimmy Choo, and Giorgio Armani—have banned fur. Humane options—such as faux fur made from hemp, frayed denim, and even recycled plastic bottles—continue to advance and are in higher demand than ever before.

Join PETA in Urging Others to Ban Fur, Too

Israel—an entire country—has banned fur. Meanwhile, Canada Goose is still selling fur from loyal, sensitive coyotes caught in painful steel traps before being shot, bludgeoned, or killed in some other violent way. Click below to urge the retailer to ditch fur now!

Sierra Club and Friends of the Earth US React to G7 Summit Climate Commitments

Sierra Club and Friends of the Earth US React to G7 Summit Climate Commitments

UNITED KINGDOM — Today, the three-day G7 summit came to an end with announcements about tackling the climate crisis. The climate and environment section of today’s Communique announced joint actions to end public support for overseas unabated coal generation by 2022 and agreed to “phase out new direct government support for carbon intensive international fossil fuel energy, except in limited circumstances at the discretion of each country.” These announcements are critical given that G7 countries provided an average of USD 86 billion in public finance for fossil fuels between 2017 and 2019 — more than three times their support for clean energy over the same time period, with the US among the worst actors. But the communique also includes a vague statement about the role of communities most affected yet least consulted about the climate crisis, stating “Together we welcome the active role and participation of vulnerable communities, underrepresented groups and will work towards achieving equality.” 

In the lead up to the G7 summit, the Sierra Club and Friends of the Earth US hosted an inaugural Global Grassroots Leaders Climate Summit, bringing together grassroots leaders representing 30 organizations from 17 countries. During the summit, leaders emphasized the demand for a just transition to a clean energy economy which centers the most vulnerable communities. They also discussed the impacts of US-financed energy projects overseas and the climate issues in their communities more broadly, and shared their demands with the Biden Administration, including Special Presidential Envoy for Climate, John Kerry, the Development Finance Corporation, the US Treasury Department, and the US Export-Import Bank. Grassroots Leaders also participated in public facing webinars elevating asks to immediately halt US overseas fossil fuel finance, shut down coal, and encourage renewable energy finance and just transition. 

In response, Sierra Club International Climate and Policy Director Cherelle Blazer released the following statement: 

“It’s a welcome sign that the United States is partnering with fellow G7 countries to acknowledge the need for a global transition off of coal and begin the phaseout of fossil fuels. However, the lack of commitment to an immediate end of financing for fossil fuel projects accompanied with FAR too little investment in new renewable energy is a game of too little too late. If the world is to meet the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement, we must make the bold steps necessary to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees. We cannot claim to grasp the ongoing — and increasingly dire — effects of the climate crisis while simultaneously prolonging the life of the fuels driving it. This past week brought welcome news, but it will only continue to serve as green rhetoric unless investment to address the climate crisis grows significantly.”

International Policy Campaigner Luisa Galvao from Friends of the Earth US released the following statement:

“G7 commitments to phase out fossil fuels are looking like swiss cheese: full of holes. While it is  welcome that G7 countries finally agreed to end public support for coal, as communities around the world have long called for, the G7 should have taken this opportunity to end support for all fossil fuels, as science and justice require. Instead, the G7’s silence on oil and gas will continue to subject communities to an unjust transition.”